Diego Maradona death: Police search home, clinic of star’s personal doctor, seize files

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In later years, Maradona struggled with substance abuse issues. “Diego was tired, tired of being ‘Maradona’,” Luque said.

The player’s lawyer, Matias Moria, on Thursday said he would ask for a full investigation of the circumstances of the soccer legend’s death, saying the health workers caring for the star were negligent.

“It is inexplicable that for 12 hours my friend has not had attention or control from the health personnel,” Moria wrote on social media. “The ambulance took more than half an hour to arrive, which was a criminal idiocy.” Prosecutors say it took 12 minutes for the ambulance to arrive.

Diego Maradona death: Police search home, clinic of star's personal doctor, seize files
Argentine soccer star Diego Maradona holds up the World Cup trophy as he is carried off the field after Argentina defeated West Germany 3-2 to win the World Cup soccer championship in Mexico City on June 29, 1986. Photo by Gary Hershorn/Reuters

Luque said faster ambulance service would not have saved Maradona’s life. “You would have needed medical equipment at his house, including a respirator,” he told reporters.

“If I am responsible of something, it is of loving him and taking care of him, extending his life and improving it until the end,” Luque said. “I am not responsible for this.”

A tearful Luque described Maradona as a difficult patient who often argued with the medical staff.

“Diego needed help,” he said. “Diego was hard. Diego kicked me out of his house and then called me again. That was the relationship, the one of a rebellious father with a son.”

— with files from the Washington Post

Diego Maradona death: Police search home, clinic of star's personal doctor, seize files